Drowsy in Three Dimensions

Drowsy in Three Dimensions

Drowsy in Three Dimensions

Scenic Paint Charge
The Drowsy Chaperone
Blake High School 2014

Michel D. D’Anna, Director
John E. Ovington, Technical Director


Scenic Paint Charge
The Drowsy Chaperone
Blake High School 2014 Michel D. D’Anna, Director
John E. Ovington, Technical Director


Being Paint Charge on this show had me painting some interesting design choices by the Scenic Designer that included two eight-foot-tall peacocks and a shadowed fountain. In these pictures, you will find not only my paint work, but also my acting work as I played the leading female role of Janet van de Graaf.

This is still one of my favorite and one of the most important techniques I have learned—highlights and shadows. After we had pounced and painted the colorful peacock, John Ovington taught me the wonders of contrast with light and dark. Shadowing is very important—it allows for the audiences’ eyes to see a detailed fountain, while it only took a few strokes with a paint brush.

Ovington taught me to place the light beam coming from the left side of the piece because that allows places like Broadway or other venues to swap and borrow set pieces, they will still match the others because the light looks like it is coming from the same direction all around. This fountain was highlighted with pure white, and was surrounded by a light blue that was a gradient to the outside edges, with some black to signify some darker shadows.



Going along the same theme of highlights and shadows, this was among the first of my projects to involve lighting with paint. Ovington, the designer, instructed me to paint the headboard while incorporating the lights and darks. In the top right picture, he showed me the procedure to follow and let me practice before completing the final board. I first had to decide where the light would hit the board. I then added the darker red to the appropriate corner, following the highlight of the light yellow in the opposing corner. I then blended the two together while palletting the colors to create the mixed midtone look.


These Chinese fans have a funny story behind them. The director found two fans in storage, however one of the fan’s paint had almost completely deteriorated; I was assigned with recreating the paint design of the nicer fan, onto the fading fan. After a time of blending and matching, I decided that I liked my new design better and to match the other fan to what I had done.


Our stair cases were more easily imagined than done. It was the first time my assistant and I had ever had to design something. We knew that we wanted the staircases to embrace the theme of swirls and elegant circles. After finally picking a design, we went to work painting with lights and darks. Abby Delaney, my assistant, had a better idea for the actual painting of the staircases than I did. During this staircase time, I realized that it is okay to not always do your own idea, but accomplish the idea that is best for the show. On stage and backstage Theatre don’t allow time for pride to get in the way of production.


Scenic Paint Charge
The Drowsy Chaperone
Blake High School 2014
Michel D. D’Anna, Director
John E. Ovington, Technical Director

Being Paint Charge on this show had me painting some interesting design choices by the Scenic Designer that included two eight-foot-tall peacocks and a shadowed fountain. In these pictures, you will find not only my paint work, but also my acting work as I played the leading female role of Janet van de Graaf.

This is still one of my favorite and one of the most important techniques I have learned—highlights and shadows. After we had pounced and painted the colorful peacock, John Ovington taught me the wonders of contrast with light and dark. Shadowing is very important—it allows for the audiences’ eyes to see a detailed fountain, while it only took a few strokes with a paint brush.

Ovington taught me to place the light beam coming from the left side of the piece because that allows places like Broadway or other venues to swap and borrow set pieces, they will still match the others because the light looks like it is coming from the same direction all around. This fountain was highlighted with pure white, and was surrounded by a light blue that was a gradient to the outside edges, with some black to signify some darker shadows.




Going along the same theme of highlights and shadows, this was among the first of my projects to involve lighting with paint. Ovington, the designer, instructed me to paint the headboard while incorporating the lights and darks. In the top right picture, he showed me the procedure to follow and let me practice before completing the final board. I first had to decide where the light would hit the board. I then added the darker red to the appropriate corner, following the highlight of the light yellow in the opposing corner. I then blended the two together while palletting the colors to create the mixed midtone look.



These Chinese fans have a funny story behind them. The director found two fans in storage, however one of the fan’s paint had almost completely deteriorated; I was assigned with recreating the paint design of the nicer fan, onto the fading fan. After a time of blending and matching, I decided that I liked my new design better and to match the other fan to what I had done.



Our stair cases were more easily imagined than done. It was the first time my assistant and I had ever had to design something. We knew that we wanted the staircases to embrace the theme of swirls and elegant circles. After finally picking a design, we went to work painting with lights and darks. Abby Delaney, my assistant, had a better idea for the actual painting of the staircases than I did. During this staircase time, I realized that it is okay to not always do your own idea, but accomplish the idea that is best for the show. On stage and backstage Theatre don’t allow time for pride to get in the way of production.


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